In everything Charles Moxon does, he believes in carrying it out in a personal way, in making a connection. There is a uniqueness about creating a personal connection with someone and getting to know them enough to raise questions about their identity through painting.

 

The way he creates that intimacy and connection is by studying someone, getting to know them and ultimately attempting to empathise with them. Moxon implements techniques that reference seventeenth century Northern European painting which is renowned for its intimate and precious scale, the clarity of subject and the jewellike luminosity that glows from within.  Working with dozens of transparent glazes of oil paint he meticulously renders the subject with extraordinary detail.

 

Throughout the portrait process there exists a never-ending questioning. He plays the role of the metaphorical detective, analysing clues and possible red herrings about the identity of the individual.  By immersing himself in the process, the sitter’s characteristics and interests are, at least for the duration of the painting (and in fact somewhat afterwards), a constant presence in his mind.

 

Portrait painting is an outlet for the connection Moxon yearns to create with people.  There is nothing quite like it. The result of the process is a precious painting that is an intimate reflection on their identity.